Mayoral (candidate) Newsletter

Joe Dickens forwards the informative newsletter below by a mayoral candidate . . . to sign up for this email newsletter click here.

Trash pick-up
will be delayed one day this week. Regular Monday pick-up will be on Tuesday. Regular Tuesday pick-up will be on Wednesday. And so on.

Solicitors
Our city recently passed an ordinance to raise expectations of people soliciting in Hendersonville. For one, the background check has been expanded. If somebody knocks on you door to sell you something, they need to have a permit from the City of Hendersonville, not Davidson County or some other agency.

Early Morning Construction
If you hear construction noises before 7:00 on weekdays or 9:00 a.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, please call the police at 615-822-1111.

My Revised Proposed Budget
Two weeks ago I proposed a budget for the city’s next fiscal year. That will be the ordinance I present to the board to be considered on June 12 and June 26.
As I created the budget, my priorities were

Pay debts
Improve our infrastructure
Provide quality services
Increase our fund balance

The highlights:
-It spends less than what we expect to bring in.
-Due to (1) borrowing last year, (2) several mid-year additions to our spending, and (3) the recent loan for the Batey Farm purchase, the city’s debt payments will increase next year by $645,000.
-Our sales tax revenue is projected to increase by $800,000 next year.
-We have found that our employee compensation is behind other similar cities. So, I am proposing merit raises for employees and cost of living adjustments. Some employees may see increases to keep their pay competitive to similar positions in other cities.
-It has $471,525 more for paving from our general fund than what we budgeted from our general fund this year.
-It includes an additional $400,000 for a new fire hall since last year’s borrowed money likely will not cover the total cost.
-It raises fees for building permits, increases residential trash fees to cover the actual trash cost, implements higher fines for property maintenance violations, and begins charging fees for blasting permits.
-Funds from blasting permits would provide $7,500 to measure nearby blasting.
-The budget will have money to replace our in-car cameras for police officers.
– It adds an investigator and five officers to our police department.
-It adds a fire inspector and 12 firefighters with the help of federal grants.
I have left some excess funds with my priorities being covering wage increases recommended by a pay study, expanding our recycling, and covering additional costs for our new fire hall. We need more information for all three of those items.

How the Board Voted on Glenbrook Village
On May 22 the board of mayor and aldermen considered an application to reduce the retail and office space and add 291 townhouses and condos near Glenbrook. The previous zoning allowed retail and office, but no living units.
After an amendment to provide more money for off-site improvements, the application passed 8-5.
Voting for the application were aldermen Brown, Campbell, Frost, Gilley, Sprouse, Skidmore, Stamper, and Woodcock. Voting against the proposal were Cunningham, Frisbee, Petrelli, Waters, and me.

What’s Going Where
Speedway is building at Saundersville Road and Gallatin Road.
Two buildings soon will be built along Saundersville Road near Stop 30 Road. They will be a TOA clinic and a 23,000-square-foot medical office building. McAlister’s is open on Indian Lake Boulevard near Union University. Clarendale, which is behind McAlister’s, will have independent living, assisted living and memory care. It will open this fall.
All Air Extreme Trampoline Park is being built in the building that previously held Kroger.
Others:
Blackbox Media Management Service, 170 E Main Street;
Express Oil Change, 182 W. Main St.;
Reemo Wireless Inc., 260-217A W Main St.;
The Way Cafe, LLC, 699 W Main St.;
Str8 Drippin Promotions, 101 Cole Ct.;
Day’s Salon, 206 Indian Lake Blvd.;
All Event Vending, 350 Old Shackle Road;
Jennifer Pierce Studio, 1047 Glenbrook Way.

China Just Curbed Everybody’s Recycling Programs
The point of recycling is to send less material to landfills. China just made that very, very difficult for the City to do. On May 13th The Wall Street Journal published a story about the impact of china’s decision last year to reduce the recyclable it buys from the U.S. Other publications tell the same story.The worldwide market for recyclables has tanked. Companies that used to buy paper and plastics from recyclers are refusing to pick them up any longer. Instead of reselling paper and plastics, the companies are ditching them in landfills because they cannot sell the recyclables.The articles states, “Many trash haulers and city agencies that paid for curbside collection by selling scrap said they are now losing money on almost every ton they handle.”The story continues, “Sacramento County, which collects trash and recyclables from 151,000 homes, used to earn $1.2 million a year selling the scrap to Waste Management and another processor from scrap. Now, the county is paying what will amount to about $1 million a year.” I want to expand our recycling program as a way to save on landfill costs to the City. But, I need a guarantee that our recyclables won’t go from our curbs to landfills.
So many companies are having to do that. In March 2017 they were happy to take in mixed paper because they could sell it for $97 per ton. In March of this year it was selling for $5 per ton. Some companies are storing the recyclables, waiting for the price to come back up. Some companies are dumping the recyclables in landfills.

Recent Building Permits
With so much rain, building permits were way down for the first four months of this year compared to last year, $25.1 million compared to $27.7 million. The number of single-family detached permits dropped from 136 to 69 during those four months.

“…to do justice, to love kindness and to walk humbly with God.”
Micah 6:8

This newsletter is paid for by Clary for Mayor. No government funds are spent on it.